Clayathon: Another Look

Lindly Haunani arrived at Clayathon on President’s Day and informed us that  Tory Hughes had died of ovarian cancer the day before, on  Sunday. Tory was just 59.  Not everyone at Clayathon was familiar with her body of work.  She was one of the first to develop polymer imitative techniques.   and to get on the video bandwagon.  She made a series of polymer videos that are still in circulation. But she was more than a pioneer;  she kept pushing herself and growing as an artist and teacher.  Her work kept evolving.  Cynthia Tinapple interviewed Tory in 2013,  and you can watch the video here. To learn more about Tory and her work, visit the Polymer Art Archive, here.
Sherman Oberson runs a great auction. Here he is with his assistants.


There were a number of  old-school polymer  pieces for sale at the auction (which raised more than $3,000.  A big chunk of it went to  Ron Lehockey’s Heart Project.) An anonymous donor contributed a number of items by City Zen Cane, Grove and Grove, Pier Voulkos, Kathy Amt and others.  Here are some pictures.  I wish I had taken more.

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And Sue Springer came through again orchestrating a collaborative mirror project. (She did this for the first time at Clayathon 2014)  The finished mirror, which was also auctioned off, went home with a very happy person.


And finally,  Cynthia Tinapple came to Clayathon this year and made a great video of the highlights.  You can watch the video here.    And if you want to learn more about  pioneering polymer artists and their work be sure to check out the Polymer Art Archive.