Fleisher Student Show 2020

SS59Fleisher Art Memorial cancelledl the closing ceremony for  its  122nd annual Student Exhibition because of the Coronavirus.  That didn’t stop me from taking pictures of some of my favorite entries.

Pottery and Ceramics

Painting

Works on Paper and Prints

Fiber Art and Mixed Media and Mosaics

SS67Sandrine Sheon won the Student Advisory Council award for her ceramic piece, Credit None, Trash Walk, 2019

This is my contribution,  Eleanor Rigby’s Secret Jar.SS63, SS60

The World According to Rina Banerjee

Colonialism. The policy or practice of acquiring full or partial political control over another country, occupying it with settlers, and exploiting it economically

Make Me a Summary of the World  was a 2019  PAFA  exhibition of  Rina Banerjee’s  work.  Banerjee’s paintings, mixed media sculpture and installations serve as her commentary on what she calls “the splintered experience of identity, tradition, and culture within diasporic communities.”   Banerjee’s  powerful  work seemed all the more compelling to me because it was juxtaposed  with  the more traditional Western works of art  gracing the hallowed halls of the Academy.

 

Banerjee’s  recurring themes are environmental awareness, colonialism, the perils of globalism and the “splintered experiences of identity, tradition, and culture, prevalent in diasporic communities.”

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A World Lost

A World Lost is Banerjee’s representation of how an imaginary island changed after pollution set in,the water evaporated,  the population migrated, and the wildlife became extinct.

Banerje’s sculpture is replete with found objects:  eggshells, discarded plastic,  light bulbs, shells, ornaments, doll parts, rocks, feathers, stones and anything else needed to carry the message.

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Daughter
One of my favorites inspired by Banerjee’s daughter.  The background is a schematic rendering of the air duct and electrical system of the Columbia office of the CDC that the artist found in a dumpster near her studio.
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Detail

Other recurring themes include feminism, mythology and the impact of colonialism.  There was a lot to see in this exhibit and even more to think about.

For more information on Rina Banerjee and her work press here and here.

What Inspires You? Cat Pottery

I’m back from Clayathon with too much to do today so this week’s post will be short. What inspires you?  I am not ashamed to say that my cat Boris (and animals in general) is a big source of inspiration for my pottery.

Boris I’ve started throwing again after a hiatus because of thumb problems.  And I like to draw on the pottery which is white earthenware clay.  Here are some small bowls that came out of the kiln this week.

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We have sponge eating monsters  in our pottery studio, so I marked my cleanup sponge accordingly:

 

Screenshot_2020-02-26 Martha Aleo on Instagram “Theft prevention in the pottery studio #humor #donttakemysponge #potteryand[...]
Remember this is a joke.  Just don’t walk off with my cleanup sponge!

Clayathon 2020

I had a great time at Clayathon this year. It’s wonderful to play with polymer with 130 of your closest friends, take classes with world class teachers, and relax in a four star hotel with a pool, fitness center and great restaurant. Organizer Arlene Groch has negotiated great rates which makes this an affordable week-long clay extravaganza. Here are some pictures.

 

 

Coming Together at Clayathon

Polymer artist Lindly Haunani is currently in the hospital with multiple severe injuries she suffered in a car accident last week. She is going to have a very long, painful, expensive recovery.

Lindly was scheduled to teach a class at Clayathon which started yesterday.  Her friend and collaborator Maggie Maggio is flying in to teach Lindly’s class for her.

The Clayathon participants have planned some extra conference activities in support of Lindly.

Watch the Creative Journey Studios website here   for exciting news about Sue and Ellen’s ambitious long term project, “52 Weeks for Lindly”.

Most importantly, Cynthia Tinapple has created a Go Fund Me page for Lindly here. Please support Lindly’s Page on your social media and email it to your contacts, and make a donation if you can.

New Earrings (Ugly Cane School Part 3)

I have pretty much exhausted my supply of ugly canes, but I think I have put them to good use.

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These earrings are what can happen when you chop up ugly canes in a mini chopper.  (I found one like this  at a thrift shop for $6.00) and add a few lumps of contrasting clay for interest.

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Another example

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So I have all these components that I plan to take  with me to Clayathon to play around with and try new combinations for earrings.    I have also been experimenting with making my own clay cutters with this kit I got on Amazon.  I will post a tutorial and a review in the future.

I’ll have a  lot to keep me busy!  Clayathon starts February 12 and goes until February 20.  A week of polymer bliss with Kathleen Dustin as this year’s guest artist.  It just doesn’t get any better than that.

 

Ugly Cane School Part Two

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Did someone say ugly canes?  How is working with this waste clay supposed to get me out of my creative slump?  I won’t say these are the ugliest canes in the world (at least they have some contrast.  Well,  of them anyway), but they do not thrill me.

I decided to slice and bake this time with the idea that I could turn out components that would look good in earrings.    I must say that I was partly inspired by these cutters I bought at Clayathon from Linda Prais of Linda’s Art Spot .
NUCLAS.

But cool cutters will not turn ugly canes into pretty ones:

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Here’s an attempt to turn some of those less than perfect canes into earring components.  Not too successful, but I am learning.  “It’s like dating,” I tell myself. “You learn what you like by learning what you don’t like.”   Well, I am sure learning what I don’t like.

 

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Aaugh!  Oodles and oodles of ugly components.  Most of them will go into the trash can.  But I am learning and I am even starting to be inspired.  More next week.

 

Ugly Cane School and Some Inspiration

I must confess that I have been singularly uninspired these past few weeks.  This hardly ever happens to me.  I’m back in the pottery studio and even threw a few pots last week which is great considering that I had CMC joint reconstruction surgery in October.

I have amassed a collection of canes over the years that I haven’t used and that have become crumbly with age.  A few years ago, I played with a bunch of them to see what I could come up with.   Today,  I dug up a few of the components I made and they’re not bad.  I think I’ll take a few to Clayathon and see if I can combine them with wire work to make some necklaces.    In the meantime,  I am going to dig through my old canes to see if I can do anything with them.  More on that next week.

Anyway, here are some results from my first ugly cane experiment.  I made veneers by passing sliced canes through the pasta machine and laminating them on sheets of clay.  I kept rolling and laminating until I came up with something interesting.  I set some of the pieces in metal, mostly heavy-gauge copper wire which I squared in my rolling mill.   I limited my color palate, something I did not do with the ugly cane experiments you will see next week. Let’s see where these ugly canes take me.

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Lentil-shaped component
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Unfinished piece.  I was still trying things out.

I made some pendants using jump rings to attach the lentil-shaped front component to a back component. While most lentil beads are attached at the edges, the parts of these swing freely.

 

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I also tried different ways of setting the polymer bezels in the metal.  This one is suspended by a jump ring drilled into the big ring which is soldered onto the long bail

I attached the polymer piece to this pendant by drilling holes in the polymer and threading 30 gauge wire to wrap around the metal frame.

 

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I attached the polymer here with tabs I soldered onto the frame and bent around the polymer.  Read this post for more information on tab setting.

 

Earrings
Simple earrings with grommets and silver wire.   They are very light.

More examples of  uses for ugly canes next week.

Cats, Cups and Cutters

This week, I went with a friend to feed the cats who live in the feral cat colonies along the Delaware River in South Philadelphia.
There’s a lot of disagreement on how to deal with these feral cats.
People dump they cats by the river to fend for themselves. A cadre of dedicated volunteers trap and spay the cats, feed them and provide shelter. The cats are grateful but being ferals, they are not approachable and will probably live out their lives in the colony unless they are trapped when they are very young and can acclimate themselves to living with a human family.
And now for the cutters part-a shipment from wish.com. Can’t wait to try the cloud cutters.




And some mugs in the pottery studio. Getting back into the swing of things.
If you are interested in cat rescue but don’t have time time or resources to volunteer or foster a cat, you can still help. Press here to donate to the Stray Cat Relief Fund.

A Cane Slicer on the Cheap!

I am gearing up for Clayathon 2020. I haven’t touched polymer in a while but started working with it again recently because I figured it would be good therapy for my hand and thumb.

I used to make a lot of canes and even wrote a little article on making geometric canes which you can read here.   There is so much better information on Youtube nowadays. But once you make the canes, you have to slice them. Below are two videos showing how to make inexpensive cane cutters. I made the first video (which I totally forgot about until someone saw it on YouTube this week and left a comment) to send to a friend to see if it was feasible to manufacture and sell an inexpensive cane cutter. Maybe it would have been, but the project never came to be. None of my ideas for the cane cutter, however,  are particularly brilliant. If you find anything that inspires you, please feel free to copy, share, or whatever.  I

 

The second video by Unruly Housewife, shows how to make a cane cutter that works on the same basic principles as mine (which were not original with me), but that is much easier to make.  Her instructions are clearer and her video is definitely better shot than mine.

A third low-cost option for a cane slicer is this one developed by Sherman Oberson and sold through Penn State Industries. Not very high tech, but it holds all shapes of canes steady for slicing and its small size makes it handy to throw into your toolbox.

 

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Happy cane slicing!