Say It with Beaded Flowers

This week, more work from Beading Yoda.  Lovely beaded flowers.

 

Colorful Herringbone

 

And bracelets inspired by Contemporary Geometric Beadwork.

 

I’ve started beading again after a long absence.  I dug out my Delicas and treated myself to copies of  Kate McKinnon’s Contemporary Geometric Beadwork, Vol. I and II.  Then a friend gave me a copy of Jean Power’s  Contemporary Geometric Beadwork Volume 2.  I’ll have plenty to keep me busy.  I’ll keep you posted.

 

New Work from the Beading Yoda

I dropped in on my friend and neighbor Jeri Schatz (AKA Beading Yoda) to show her the rings I have been making and to get some tips and constructive criticism.   (Jeri studied goldsmithing at the Kulicke-Stark Academy in New York and served an apprenticeship there before she moved to Philadelphia and began beading.)  After we were finished, I asked her t what she was working on, and she took down to beading central so I could see for myself.

 

BeadingTable

The Beading Table

BeadedBeads

Beaded Beads

Bracelets

Bracelets

DuoandRAW

Super Duos combined with seed beads

Multi-layered Geometric Bracelet

Hands

 

InProgress

New  necklace design

 

LacyBracelet

A geometric bracelet that moves wonderfully when you wear it.

Sampling

Geometric, Herringbone, and Peyote

Sampling2

More bracelets with Super Duo beads, triangles, bars and seed beads.

My New Favorite Jewelry Making Videos

Quick, what’s the difference between synclastic and anticlastic?  You’ll find the answer to this question and more in Andrea Harvin-Kennington’s   video Shell Forming for Jewelry Making.   She possess an encyclopedic knowledge  of metal forming techniques gleaned from years of education and studio time and is a fabulous teacher.  I found myself absolutely mesmerized  watching her demonstrate how to form metal using hammers and stakes, explaining every step in the process.  She has also developed her own line of micro metal forming tools.  I am definitely going to explore these techniques on my own when I have more time.  Kennington also teaches occasionally.    I have the feeling that a class with her would be well worth the time and money.

I don’t ever see myself making my own mokume gane.  That being said,  I recommend that anyone interested in metal smithing take the time to watch Interweave’s  mokume gane videos with  the engaging and expert Chris Ploof. In addition to his informative commentary on the process, Ploof is bursting with helpful  information on metal,  tools, safety which he shares throughout the videos.  The process of fabricating mokume gane is fascinating to watch  and Ploof’s explanations are illuminating and entertaining.  The Bracelet and Hollow Pendant videos do not delve into the mokume gane fabrication process but they are excellent jewelry making  tutorials by themselves.

My last new favorites are Susan Lenart Kazmer’s enameling videos from Interweave, Explorations in Jewelry Enameling which covers torch and kiln enameling and Further Explorations which focuses on liquid enamels and kiln firing.  OK, I admit it.  I wanted to eat everything she makes.  I love her primitive sense of style and her bold and dramatic use of color.  I’ve been hooked ever since I took a course with her a few years ago.

Kazmer has been accused in the past of being  a bit loosey goosey about studio safety and I am not going to address that here except to say that she covers safety practices and ergonomics in both videos.  And she certainly has put her own spin on enameling with her distinctive sense of design.  She gives  thorough explanations of how she shapes the metal and   prepares it for enameling.  Her “on the fly” style of working might seem deceptively simple, but just watching her work made me want to experiment using her techniques.  That’s one thing I love about her:  she gives her students  the tools to develop their individuality. And she makes it look like so much fun!  Kazmer  covers the basics of torch and kiln enameling. But even though she is  a wonderfully clear and generous teacher,  I do not recommend these videos for rank enameling beginners who want to learn the process,  because there is a lot of information about tools and materials that Kazmer does not cover.   The videos are explorations into enameling techniques and geared toward those who have some knowledge of enameling and want to push their  creative envelopes.

Speaking of creativity and people whose work I admire,  I was lucky enough to meet Nikia Angel, at Beadfest this weekend. She is one of my all-time favorite bead designers ever since I discovered Sparkly Wheels and, as it turned out, a lovely person with fascinating stories to tell.  Nikia has patterns for some of her stunning designs on her Etsy page, here.

Beaded Bezel Frenzy!!!!!

You might or might not remember my previous posts on fusing glass cabochons using ugly beads and scraps.   So what do you do with all those tasty glass baubles?  One thing you can do it surround them with beaded bezels.  And since every cabochon is different, every bezel has to be different right?

IMG_8787

cropped-img_8788.jpg

I used   right angle weave stitch along with peyote,  some netting and some herringbone.

IMG_8796

I used Delicas and Japanese and  Czech seed beads seed beads in sizes  0/15 to 0/6.

IMG_8790

I had a lot of fun with the beaded drops.

IMG_8793

I kept adding beads until I liked what I saw.    I didn’t use any patterns.

IMG_8791

I didn’t bead on a surface; all of the beaded bezels are open

IMG_8797

This one is fit for a queen!

While I didn’t bead a bezel for every cabochon I had fused,  I have an awful lot of these babies.  They are now cozying up to one another on my beading table until I decide what do do with them.  Which is got I got into this  mess in the first place!

  

Bead Shopping in Portland

Dava Front_new

Stores like Dava Beads in Portland Oregon are hard to find these days. It’s a full service, generously-stocked  bead shop. 

\

Inside_new

Sunny and inviting and scads of beads- something for every one and every budget.  And classes and books and magazines and a friendly knowledgeable staff.  What more could you want?  Classes?  They have those.  A few good restaurants within walking distance?  They have those too.

needles_new

 I found plenty of different sized needles there including size 13s


Beads5_new

You can get Delicas and Charlottes and they have a respectable selection of 15/0 beads

Beads4_new

You can buy in bulk.  There are 11/0 Czech beads

Beads3_new

And antique and vintage buttons.  

I’m sure that the stock has changed since the last time I was there.  All the better! Portland is a great city for walking, dining and bookstores!  And Dava Beads.

Triangle Beaded Beads

I have been experimenting with cross weaving which is sometimes referred to as two needle right angle weave.  It definitely uses a different set of “head muscles” than single needle RAW, but it’s not that difficult to learn.    Below are some examples of beads that I discovered by accident while trying to do something else.    My beads are not new discoveries; I have since found other examples of them  on the Internet.

Triangle weave is not right angle weave strictly speaking because the beads are not pointing at right angles,  but it lends itself to a great deal of possibilities depending on the size and shape of the beads you use, how long you keep repeating the pattern, and the manner in which you repeat the pattern.   You can also weave a pattern similar  similar to hexagon angle  weave that to my eyes resembles more of a star pattern than regular hexagon weave.  Then again, these are more likely the same  patterns but they look different to me  depending on whether I use oval-shaped beads or round beads.

The two beaded beads below are extremely simple to make.  The one you see here  is made from six  beads.

I have been experimenting with cross weaving which is sometimes referred to as two needle right angle weave. It definitely uses a different set of “head muscles” than single needle RAW, but it’s not that difficult to learn. Below are some examples of beads that I discovered by accident while trying to do something else. My beads are not new discoveries; I have since found other examples of them on the Internet.

 

This bead is made from nine beads and I have added some seed bead accents.  

The 12 bead beaded cube is the easiest one of all to make.  Here is a good video tute to get you started.

Give these beads a try if you are interested in learning some of the more complex bead cross weaving.

A Golden Age

I have lately  been binge-watching  historical mini series’  set in the Elizabethan-Era. I started out with Elizabeth R, (very good-how could anything with Glenda Jackson be bad?) followed that up with The Tudors (historically inaccurate but beautiful costumes) and have just finished watching The Six Wives of Henry VIII. (The best of all-acting, script and historical accuracy).  But I watch for more than acting or script or history.  No, I watch for the jewelry.

The reign of Elizabeth I of England is often referred to as The Golden Age of English History, or the English Renaissance.   I do not dream about what it would have been like to live in the days of Shakespeare and sonnets.   I have to admit that  for me, plague,  bear baiting, public executions and religious wars are major turn offs.   But then there is the jewelry. Here are some images I found on the Internet along with some links that provide fascinating information about jewelry (Western European mostly) from the late Middle Ages to the Late Renaissance.  

 

 

 

 

Victoria and Albert Museum

Lucrezia Borgia

 

 A young Elizabeth I

 

I am currently in jewelry design mode and have been trolling the Internet for interesting visuals.  Here are a few good links I’ve found:

Late Middle Ages Early  Renaissance

Italian Renaissance

Medici Jewelry

Royal Collection Trust

The English Crown Jewels

 The Cheapside Hoard

Jewelry and men in Tudor and Jacobean England

Girdle Prayer Book

You might also be interested in

A modern twist: Elizabethan Beads post here.

Enjoy!

Elizabethan Beads

Years ago, I took a beading class with a woman named Alois Powers called “Elizabethan Beads.”  Powers  had designed some very stunning self-supported beaded beads made up of seed beads and crystals and she was an excellent teacher as I recall.

8

Here are some pictures of what I made in the class and afterward.

7

6

5

4

3

2

And thus my frenzy for beaded beads was born.  I still have all of my class materials, made some more beads and have worked out some of my own designs which Powers encouraged her students to do.

1

Obviously, I cannot share any of the patterns.Fortunately the Internet abounds with information and ideas for making these jeweled  treasures.   Sidonia Petki’s channel on YouTube   is a fabulous resource.  Sidonia also sells tutorials on her Etsy Site.

Here is my favorite (so far) Sidonia beading tutorial video.

The Big (Blog Hop) Reveal

It’s time for the 8th Bead Soup Blog Party Reveal! Here is what I made from the beads my parter Marta Grabalowska sent me. Her blogs are http://galeriakota.blogspot.com/ and http://wilkmademe.tumblr.com/.

My bead soup was not my typical color palate and I consider that a good thing! I realized that I had some pink seed beads in my stash that I thought I would never use. They were almost identical to the ones  in the soup. I mixed them with  beige and tan beads of a similar value  and threw in some turquoise  beads to make a bead crochet pattern. I used the remaining beads as embellishment.

1a

The copper clasp holds the rope closed. I beaded around the focal cameo and went for an asymmetrical look. I am very happy with the result. Thank you Marta!!!

Here are some more pictures.

Thank you Lori Anderson for making another great beading experience possible!! You can find a list of all the participants on Lori’s blog.

Jeri’s New Jewels

Not many words this week, just pictures of  new beaded baubles from Jeri Schatz.

1

2

 

3  

4

 

5 

7

  

8

  

9

  

10

    The beauty of these little elements is that you can make a bunch of them in your favorite palette and then combine them with one another or other elements (beaded beads?  lampworked beads?) to make a one of a kind beaded creation.  

6

And the possibilities for making clasps, closures and focal pieces are unending!

  Jerri  teaches beading and is currently offering classes at the Fashion Institute of Technology  in NYC and The Bead Garden in Havertown, PA.