Clay Carnival Las Vegas 2011-The Movie

There is so much to see in Las Vegas that I decided to make a video about my Clay Carnival experience rather than write about it.  I hope you enjoy watching!

Canes, Canes and More Canes

I initially tried polymer clay because of its amenability to caning techniques.  I had always loved African Trading Beads and wanted to try my hand at millefore.  No matter what I do with polymer clay, I always find myself coming back to caning.

So when my copy of Donna Kato’s eagerly awaited new book, The Art of Polymer Clay Millefiore Techniques came in the mail, I snuck off and read it from cover to cover.

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You don’t need intricate canes to have a pleasing design. The simple caned necklaces below were inspired by a design I saw in South Africa.  I learned the spiral and jelly roll cane techniques from Donna Kato’s demos and classes.

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Continue reading “Canes, Canes and More Canes”

DVD’s from Kato, Miller and a Calder Article


 

Donna Kato Presents: Tips, Tricks & Techniques for Polymer Clay  is three and a half hours of Donna Kato demonstrating caning, transfers, mica shift, finishing techniques and more. The gals at video night (you know who you are) gave it a five (out of five) pasta machine rating. A bargain at $34.95. To order, press here.

I love everything Sharilyn Miller. (To see my review of her Tribal Treasures video, press here.) I just got finished watching her Ethnic Style Jewelry Workshop video, and all I can say is “Wow!” Another three and one half hours of valuable information on wire working, and instructions for making four bracelets and two necklaces. A steal at $39.95. To order it, Press here.

I wrote about the Alexander Calder Jewelry Exhibit at the Philadelpha Museum of Art in an earlier post. The latest issue of Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist has an article on Calder’s jewelry well worth reading: “Calder’s Mobile Jewelry” by Cathleen McCarthy.

More Bracelets

Here more results from a bunch of bracelet experiments from about four or five years ago. I made the tile bracelets after watching Gwen Gibson’s bracelet video and the cuff bracelets after taking a class with Donna Kato. I learned the technique for the beads in the pink bracelet in a Margaret Maggio class.

Final Pictures from Synergy

 The View from My Hotel Room

 

  Some of the other things I enjoyed at Synergy were Jana Roberts Benzon’s Dimensions in Polymer Clay workshop, Tim McCreight’s Design Decisions, Good, Better, Best presentation, Blogging workshop with Cynthia TinappleSusan Lomuto, and Alison LeeCraft in America lecture with Art Historian Jo Lauria.    I hear they are already thinking about Synergy 2010. Enjoy the slide show!

 

More Pictures from Synergy

The only problem with claiming that you took more than 300 pictures is that not all of them turn out.   But never mind.  There are some more pictures of old friends and new acquaintances all having a good time at Synergy.   And I still have more to come. But someone is going to have to tell me who that is sitting with Melanie West.  It’s a great picture of Melanie and I forgot who the other gal is!

Philadelphia Area Polymer Clay Guild

I have been a member of the Philadelphia Area Polymer Clay Guild for over ten years.  Joining the Guild is one of the best deals around.

Aside from offering an extensive library of books and videos, clay days, field trips to Polymer Clay Express, and loads of good people ready to enable your clay adiction, the Guild has a twice-yearly newsletter, The Clay News, a Blog, a Flickr site, and our  yearly retreat held in May, Polydelphia.

During the time I have been a member, I have taken guild-sponsored classes with Gwen Gibson, Maggie Maggio, Lindly Haunani, Elise Winters, S.L. Savarick, Donna Kato, Grant Diffendaffer and Dan Cormier and Tracy Holmes.

And don’t forget the Guest Artist Program,  the only one if its kind.    Nationally known artists give classes  on a Saturday to Guild members who  pay tuition.   The  the artist attends the regularly scheduled Sunday Guild meeting and teaches and demonstrates for the entire Guild.  Or maybe the teacher comes to the meeting only, as a guest teacher.  The artist fees come out of member dues and Guild fundraisers.  How cool is that?  To learn more about this great program, click here, and read the story in the September 2007 issue of The Clay News on page 4.

If you want to join us, check out our web site.  Dues are only $30.00 a year.  At that price, how can you afford not to join?