Allow Me To Vent

This has been a frustrating week.  Pictures have disappeared from my hard drive.  MS Word has chosen to save parts of documents and not others.   I spent time circling the gas pumps trying to figure out how to get the fuel tank on the rental car to the correct side to pump gas. And what do you call it when you’re about to finish sewing something, prick your finger with the needle, and bleed on the fabric?  (It’s  a good thing I know the cold water dab don’t rub trick.)   At this point, I  could write a book entitled  Tips and Tricks for Idiots.  And to top it off, I have to start brushing Boris’s teeth.  Oh, the humanity.

Which brings me to the matter of the vent.  My studio is in my basement and I would like to be able to solder and  make glass beads in the winter time.  But the ventilation is not so good with all the windows shut.  So I decided to get me some ventilation.  I first asked my plumber who was doing some work on my house and he proposed something that was expensive and more like the kind of ventilation you would need in a dairy barn with 500 lactating cows. Except that I love my plumber (how many of you can say that?)  And maybe it was my fault. Maybe I asked for too much. I have a habit of doing that to men.   Just ask my husband. Or my plumber.  

Plan B-YouTube.  Mymy there are a lot of YouTubers out there growing vegetables. And flowers.  In tents,  There is a lot of information on how to ventilate your <cough, cough> crops.  If you don’t like gardening,  jeweler Nancy Hamilton has a good tute on how to set up a fume extractor  system for jewelry soldering here.  There are also a lot of instructive images on that famous time sucker, Pinterest. Very few how-tos, though.   I didn’t know how to connect duct work or how to install an in-line fan. But when has a lack of knowledge ever stopped me?  I got married,  didn’t I?

Here’s what I did.  But first, allow me to vent.  Will you look at this window? It’s 14 X 6. Whoever heard of a window like that except in South Philly? It’s probably the only one in the world.  I needed to cut something to fit said window, and then cut a 4 inch circle out of that to put the dryer hose through. I grabbed an old plastic  storage container, cut it to size,  made the hole,  got a vent collar at Home Depot and I had my hole to the outside.

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I needed an inline fan with a speed controller that was not too noisy.    I ordered this    from Amazon waited two weeks for it and then they cancelled my order and gave the option to reorder.  Wha?  I asked them, how about you give me free overnight delivery and I order it again.  They said yes and it came the next day.

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Now, I don’t know the numbskull who designs these things, but there was no room for a drill or screwdriver to allow me to attach it to the wall.  So I had to brace a couple of stud scraps, run the screws through backwards, fasten the stud to the wall and   fasten the fan to the stud with nuts.  Nuts I to that say.

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While I am venting,  I learned that the adjustable clamps are next to useless for attaching duct reducers to the fan or ducks to ducts.  Or ducts to ducks or ducts to ducts.  But I learned (through thorough research those indoor gardeners know everything!) about self tapping machine screws.  Except mine would not self tap.  They were probably worried about going blind.  Do you even get that joke?  I ended up making the holes for them and all was well.

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The speed controller which is also the on-off switch  is off to the side.  

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Here is the completed venting system.  I put a blast gate on the other side of the T duct because I might want to extend the system.  I then have to put another blast gate on the bottom of the T duct to close it off.  That project comes under the heading of maybe later or maybe never.  My favorite part of the system is the hood with is a trash-picked wok cover that I cut a hole in.  I got the rest of the stuff from Amazon and Home Depot.

 

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How does it work?  Look at the picture.  I’m happy.  All the parts even with my mistakes cost about $100.00.

 

 

 

Another View of Edinburgh

This has been a good week for spinning my wheels, losing things and taking forever to get things done.  I will not bore you with the sordid details.

I had the good fortune to visit Edinburgh, Scotland recently and took hundreds and hundreds of pictures.  I decided to skip the scenic travel pictures and share the more unconventional ones  ones with you.

1.BrainandLady

My husband, apparently encountering a clown on his way to  a circus dress rehearsal.

4.Sign

It’s no stranger than an English sign in China, but the juxtaposition of “Tartan Weaving Mill”  caught my eye.

6.TheWorld

What us this world welcoming us into?

1.NewWorld

A new world disorder?

 

5.TheEnd

We can meet at the pub at The World’s End

 

7.Zombiewalk

And if the Zombies find us.

 

2.Castle

We can escape to Edinburgh Castle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Studio in Retrograde?

I am in the process of tearing my studio apart and doing a major purge in preparation for replacing my kiln.  I have had a Jen-Ken Bead Annealer for years and have used it for bead annealing and glass fusing.  I have been very happy with it.  A few years ago, I got a great deal on  a programmable remote controller  to go with the kiln.   And then I started to use the kiln to fire copper clay which necessitated resetting the controller to handle metal firing schedules which go to a higher temperature than glass.  So my kiln will now reach a maximum of 2000 F which is suitable for low fire ceramic clays.  (cone 04)

Except I love porcelain and stoneware  which fire at cone 6.  (Some porcelain fires at cone 10 but I am interested in working at cone 6. ).  My work space is relatively small but I do a lot of things in it including sewing, polymer, beading, lamp working, fusing, mixed media and metal smithing.  I have a couple of enameling kilns that I don’t use that often but that I want to hold onto.  

So now that I have done a major purge and rearrangement, I plan to install ventilation for soldering and lamp working  and for a new kiln so I can do luster firing and cone 6 firing.  And I have to figure how to either sell the old kiln or trade it towards a new model.  We’ll see

In the meantime, I really wanted to show you some of the new pottery I’ve  been working on. But WordPress is buggy tonight (as it sometimes is-hey I love WordPress but sometimes it’s buggy!)

 

Instead of uploading  pictures of eight different pieces, I have managed to upload one picture eight times.  I am utterly baffled at how things like this can happen.  This is the second time I have tried to upload the pictures with the same mystifying result.  My friend Toni would say that Mercury is in retrograde.  But in retrograde in my computer?

I hope you enjoy my picture.  🙂

 

Nattering Nabobs of Negativity

A dear friend died in May, 2010. He was so supportive when his close friend and our friend Ray died and during Shari’s illness and death soon after.  The fact that he died so soon after they did seems surreal.  But he loved to laugh and he loved the outdoors.  He took to the Appalachian Trail in Spring of 2009.  He sent out the pictures  you see here when he returned.

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There remains the matter of the skunk.  Before he died, he gave me permission to post the video (see  below)  on this blog,  provided that I  identified him by his stage name,  Raoul McCool.  He sent out the video to  friends who knew his secret identity with this note:

“Please recall that, among the photographs of his Appalachian Trail hike that he sent to you in May [2009], were several that clearly showed [Raoul] in close conversation with a small black and white striped creature that many of you correctly identified as a skunk.  Unfortunately, [Raoul] was profoundly saddened to learn that some of you expressed doubt as to the authenticity of the said skunk.  Some of you went so far as to opine audaciously that the said skunk was, in fact, a stuffed skunk that [Raoul] had carried with him for some 50 treacherous miles over the mountains.  Some of you even stated that you would not be convinced of [Raoul’s] near supernatural ability to psychically commune with our little tuxedoed terrorists of the terai unless you saw a video of him conversing with an real independently moving skunk.

Well, you nattering nabobs of negativity.  Cast your doubting eyes upon the attached video file, oh ye of little faith, and thence go forth and doubt no more.”  -Raoul McCool

Goodbye Raoul.  You were a good friend and you made us laugh.  We will all miss you  terribly.  Especially the skunk.