Inspiration: How to Get It.



Sometimes children get crazy notions into their heads. I had a friend who swore that there was a city called ”Random” in upstate New York where contest winners were picked. (“Winners will be selected at random.”)

My personal crazy childhood belief was that every song had already been written, and that it was impossible to compose a totally new song. I know now that this isn’t the case, but I could not imagine that anyone could invent any new music beyond that which already existed. It had all been done.

But I also know that there were times in popular music history (for one example), when all music started sounding the same until a visionary or a visionary movement came along and blew up the paradigm. Until someone shakes things up, we get mired in the same old same old. It takes a a new way seeing and hearing to move upforward. And openness and a willingness to explore. If you want a concrete example of this has happened in the past, watch the segments on David Bowie in Apple TV’s documentary 1971: The Year That Changed Everything.

It can seem impossible to come up with a fresh design that works on all levels. We have all been subjected to brutally over-designed fashion masquerading as something new. As for me, I have been struggling the past few weeks with trying to come up with some new earring designs that are unhackneyed, original, and my own.

Where are you supposed to get inspiration? Everyone recommends searching Pinterest, but I have a problem with that. I don’t think it will help my cause to look at countless pictures of earrings. Sure, I can copy someone else’s designs. But without getting into the moral/ethical dilemma copying debate, (a topic that I think has been done to death and needs to be put to rest, ) after I have learned a technique, why on earth would I want copy someone else’s work? I want to be more than a technician. That’s the goal. So the question becomes where to find inspiration.

Picasso is known for saying that good artists copy and that great artists steal. What does this mean? Does it mean that great artists commit copyright infringement? I don’t think so. Let me explain. Two artists who ”stole” to great effect were Antonio Gaudi and Elsa Peretti. How did they do it? Here’s a clue: Polymer artist Kathleen Dustin says that part of her job as an artist is to pay attention.

Gaudi and Peretti paid attention. Here are two videos that show how they did it.

How many of us truly pay attention? I am going to start working on it.

Synergy I: The History of Polymer Clay in Bead Making

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Polymer clay came into use before the Internet and before pasta machines, tissue blades and the other tools we now take for granted.  Kathleen Dustin was there from the beginning, so she was well qualified to deliver a talk at Synergy on the history of polymer clay in bead making. (Most of us know that it was originally developed as a doll making material). If you want to see some of the pictures from the slide show, they will be posted soon on the Polymer Art Archive

In the coming days, I plan to put up slide shows from the pictures I took at the Synergy conference. Keep checking  for updates. The most convenient way is to add this blog’s feed to your news reader.  You can also subscribe  by email using the tools in the bar on the right hand side.