Nerikomi In Progress

Now that I have a kiln that can fire to cone 8, I can finally experiment with colored porcelain and Nerikomi on my own schedule without having to wait forever to see how a pot comes out. I am using mason stains to color 257 porcelain which I bisque fire at Fleisher Art Memorial, and then fire it a second time at home, unglazed, to cone 6 . This porcelain was made to be fired to cone 8-10, but it gives very nice results at cone 6 which is how they fire it at The Clay Studio where I first started using it. I only take my kiln to cone 6 to preserve the firing elements. I’m learning as I go by watching videos and reading what I can on the Internet. Most of the books on the subject cost a small fortune and I haven’t found any in my local library. No matter. I’m having fun and that’s the only thing that counts.

How’s this for inspiration? I love the spiral motif and never saw it in a plant before-not like this anyway. Anyone know what this plant is called?

Gray, black and white spirals sliced like jellyrolls
Holes plugged with white clay
This will be the top of the bowl
Bottom of bowl over a form
Inside of bowl inside the form.

When the bowl gets leather hard, I will smooth it with a metal rib. It is extremely fragile when it’s bone dry, so I try to do most of the work at the leather hard stage. After it’s bisque fired, I’ll sand it with wet/dry sandpaper and then fire to cone 6. After that? I plan to experiment with paste wax. This will be a decorative bowl.

Nerikomi Mon Amour

I have become fascinated with the ceramic art of Nerikomi which is understandable since I work in polymer and glass.  Nerikomi is the name of a technique similar to millefiore  for creating patterns in clay using  colored clay.  Nerikomi is also known as Neriage  but  I am not sure what, if any, the differences are.

Be that as it may, the first Nerikomi I ever saw what the work of Cate Fetterman at The Clay Studio in the 1980s.  Recently I saw that Nell Hazinski, another pottery artist I met at The Clay Studio, was giving a Nerikomi workshop in the Philadelphia area.  I couldn’t take the workshop, but I decided to try the technique after seeing these two pots in the Victoria and Albert Museum Ceramic collection

I am sorry to say that I do not know the name of the artist.  I think it might be Dorothy Feibleman, but I cannot confirm that.  You should check out her work anyway.

Here is my first attempt at Nerikomi using white earthenware and Mason Stains. I am currently trying the technique with colored porcelain which gives a much nicer result.

1.MarthaNerikomi

Here is a fascinating video showing the Nerikomi process.