New Ideas for Making Jewelry from Spoons

A couple of years ago, I posted a tutorial on making a bracelet from old spoons that proved to be quite popular.  Here are examples of more types of jewelry you can make from old spoons.

Here’s a torch enameled spoon bowl pendant that I drilled  for a jump ring before enameling.   The copper ring is a big jump ring soldered shut, hammered flat and textured.  When my friend Terri saw it, she remarked that she would have used the concave part of the spoon bowl instead of the convex side as I did.  Which opens up a bunch of new design possibilities that I plan to explore.

Here are two pairs of earrings made from different parts of the spoon handle.  First, I cut the pieces to the proper length and filed them smooth.  I filed a gentle curve on the top pair because I think it looks more attractive than a straight edge.  Then I drilled holes and filed off the burs.  I patinated them in liver of sulfur,  and made ear wires from fine silver on which I had previously balled the ends.  After inserting the wires through the holes in the earrings I gently hammered fhe balls flat so the  wire would stay in place and the earrings would hang  properly.  Finally, I smoothed the  other end of the wires with a cup bur in a rotary tool.

I’m a Craftster Best of 2009 Winner!

Craftster Best of 2009 Winner

Here’s a picture of the winning project

Craftster  is a wonderful online  crafting community where members post thousands of tutorials and DIY projects every year on every craft you could imagine.   It’s one of the first places I go when I want to learn something about a craft.  It’s an honor and a surprize to have been named a 2009 winner.

See all the  Best of 2009 winners here and the Spoon Bracelet project here.   Here is some more information and comments.

And now I’m off to Clayathon!  Here are pictures from Clayathon 2008 and Clayathon 2009.

New Products and Old Favorites

A few weeks ago, I wrote about Pardo Clay and Precious Metal Paint from German Company Viva Decor. At the time, no one I knew of in the U.S. carried Precious Metal Paint. It looks like that is going to change. Poly Clay Play has limited quantities now and hopes to have more available for sale in the future.  Check the web site for more information.

Some Poly Clay Play shipments from Europe were delayed, but will be available as soon as they arrive. Trish Hodgens of Poly Clay Play is taking pre-orders on the large 480 gram (about 1.05 lb.) jars of Pardo Clay for $21.95 each and the small jars 75 gram (2.6 oz) for $4.95 each ($1.00 off the suggested retail price.) For more information, check out the web site or email Trish Hodgens.

No one sells brass or copper bezel wire. If you don’t have a rolling mill to make it, you can make your own from 28 or 30 gauge metal. Even that is hard to find unless you want to do a roof. But I found a supplier!!! The Whimsie Studio carries 6″ X 12″ sheets of 30 gauge copper and brass. The price and shipping were reasonable (even by my cheapskate standards). And the stuff comes pronto.

You don’t need a saw to cut the bezels. I use Fiskars Utility Scissors I bought at Polymer Clay Express. They work like a charm,


except I still can’t cut a straight line. That’s why God made files.

Speaking of files and all sorts of cheap metal working tools, if you are just starting out and don’t want to spend a lot of money, try Harbor Freight. Besides hammers, files, anvils, Helping Hands for $2.99 and other goodies, you can buy stuff, take it home and figure out what to do with it. I used their Body and Fender Set to make bracelets from spoon handles. If you want, but can’t afford a disk cutter, try their Hollow Punch Set and a sturdy hammer. It really works.

Some Web Sites I Like

For interesting takes on Metalsmithing and Metal Jewelry,  check out the work of David Paul Bacharach, Barbara Briggs and Connie Fox’s wonderful site, Jatayu

To learn to make just about anything, check out Instructables and the Ready Made Magazine web site.

No matter what kind of art you’re into, you’re sure to find something that interests you on Wet Canvas.

Happy Surfing!

I’m at Polydelphia!

I’m at Polydelphia this weekend!!! To check out my newly designed web site, press HERE. See ya later!

My Lust For Rust

I came upon Altered Curiosities by accident. It’s not the kind of book I would usually buy. But boy, I am so glad this book made it to my door. Don’t pass it by like I almost did. It’s packed with information on all kinds of crafts that seemingly bear no relation to one another. Yet author Jane Ann Wynn pulls them all together, with unconventional materials, and makes art. I didn’t try any of her projects, but I read through the book more than once and am taking inspiration from it for my own work.


For example, I love the look of rust (but not on my appliances, please! ) and patinas. I picked up a rusty washer on the street the other day and struck up a conversation with it. When I was finished, I had this pendant. I added a silver plated spoon hammered flat, gold filled wire, turquoise and copper. I think that Altered Curiosities got me thinking in a new way.

While running errands today, I found all these cool rusty bits on the sidewalk. These are going to end up in something. I’ll wait for them to talk to me first, like the washer did.


If any of this appeals to you, check out the art of Annette Tacconelli’s Urban Artifacts. If little washers talk to me, bridges and pieces of buildings talk to her. Not only is her art beautiful and hard to forget; it will stoke your creative juices even more.




Repurposing Revisited


      This necklace is made from part of another one of my Grandmother’s silverplated spoons. After I made the bracelet I showed in an earlier post, I decided to try something new. The cabochon is polymer. The spoon is dapped, pierced, and patinated.  The cab is held in place with gold filled wire.  The pendant is strung on rubber cord and finished with Balinese style vermeil spacers and a vermeil clasp.  I am exploring more ways to make jewelry from spoons and found objects. I will post the more interesting results.

Spoon Bracelet from Recycled Materials

     I wanted to make a meaningful Christmas present for a younger family member.  My mother had given me my Grandmother’s  silver plate and  said that it would be OK if I made jewelry out of it.  I took two teaspoons and heated them until they were cherry red with my lamp working torch.  After letting them cool, I clamped them into a vise and sawed off the handles with my jeweler’s saw.  I filed off the rough edges and drilled holes in both ends of each handle.  I shaped the pieces with a rubber covered mallet and a form made to hammer out dents in cars.  Then I threw the handles in the pickle pot to clean off most of the fire scale.  Next, I used a wire brush attachment in my drill to clean off the rest of the dirt and shine them up.  I filed around the rough edges of the holes I’d drilled and went over the handles with steel wool before polishing them with muslin buffing wheel and rouge.

          I assembled the pieces with jump rings I’d made previously, and a lobster clasp.  When I don’t solder jump rings, I like to make them oval shaped with the cut on the side because they are stronger and less likely to pull apart which is important for a bracelet.  I was going to put a lamp-worked bead dangle on the front with a wrapped loop.  I ended up using the dangle you see in the picture-an  odd earring belonging to my mother. 

          I have a full set of my Grandmother’s silver plate and a ton of ideas for using it to make jewelry.  What about a ring or bracelet for my maternal girl cousins?  That’s a thought.  It would be a good way to share the silver plate with the family. 

          Yesterday, my Mother was telling me about the wonderful Christmas dinners  my Grandmother  cooked years ago.  I imagine they enjoyed more than one with the spoons I used on this bracelet.  I never knew my Grandmother.  The picture of her below must have been taken when she was 16  or so, which would make it circa 1900.


Emma Peterson Montgomery