Street Art in Lisbon

Last week’s post on the Philadelphia Fashion District referenced the Streetsdept.com blog which chronicles street art in Philadelphia.  I love street art because it’s free for the viewing,  usually relevant to current events, or a chronicle of  past events that need to be memorialized.  People have been drawing and writing on public walls since ancient times.  Street art can be viewed as a crime or high art.   I prefer to think of it as  public art.

Lisbon in Portugal has a lively and vibrant street art scene as I discovered on a  trip there earlier this year.  Here are some highlights:TheFoxLisbon89

The Fox covers the side of a building and is made up of junk and recycled materials.

Read more about the artist, Attero Bordalo II, here.

 

The Alfama District is home to some great street art including a mural dedicated to Fado singer Maria Severa Onofriana.

LisbonWalkingTourAlfama13Respect Stpry of Old Women Graffifi Artists

Here’s one of my favorite Lisbon murals.  It’s called “Respect” and is also in the Alfama District.  Apparently there is a whole cadre of senior street and graffiti artists in Lisbon.  We were told that this mural depicts one of them reacting when a younger colleague does not show her the respect to which she is entitled.  Read more about the older artists here.  Read the real story behind the Respect mural here.

Some more  Lisbon street art picturesLisbonWalkingTourAlfama76 2LisbonWalkingTourAlfama10IMG_7923IMG_6967IMG_6949IMG_6872IMG_6862IMG_6860

If you want to learn more about Lisbon street art, the Camels and Chocolate  blog is a good place to start.  Better yet, go to Lisbon and walk the streets.

 

 

Marionette Museum Lisbon

The Marionette Museum in Lisbon wasn’t mentioned in any of the guide books or web sites consulted before the trip.  But my friend Rachel, who had recently returned from Portugal, raved about it.  That and I have a penchant for traveling with Le Mutt who is the creation of puppeteer Francesca Hoerlein.  How could I resist?

The Lisbon Marionette Museum houses more than marionettes.  Its collection contains hand puppets, shadow puppets, masks, props and, of course marionettes from all over the world.

Greek

Puppets have been around for thousands of years.  There was a puppet theater in Greece in the 5th Century BCE.  And puppets might even be older than that.

We all remember puppet shows from our childhood.  But puppets are more than dolls used to entertain children.  Puppets tell stories, sometimes subversive stories, that live actors would not be allowed to perform.

punchandjudy

And puppets are are made from every material imaginable.  The Museum houses creations made of cloth, wood, class, metal and clay.  I am sure there are 3D printed puppets out there.

ClaymationSpaceman

Be sure to visit the Marionette Museum if you are in Lisbon.  It’s not a big museum-you can see the entire collection in a couple of hours-and you will be glad you did.  Here are some more pictures.