My Introduction to the Construction Junction.

My husband is a silly man who often claims, when I ask him a question, that I am “grilling him like a salmon.”  But he is a good sport.  After all, he married me, didn’t he?  So when we were in Pittsburgh last year for the opening of Into The Forest, he agreed when I told him I needed to make a stop at the Construction Junction. He even opened the door for me!


The Construction Junction is a nonprofit used and surplus building material retailer.  It accepts all kinds of donations-construction materials, old appliances, electrical supplies, plumbing supplies, tools, lighting, building materials and many other things too numerous to mention.  This keeps stuff out of landfills and gives it a second life when it leaves in the hands of a customer to be used in a new project.



But the construction junction is also a mecca for creative types.  I found some embossed tiles there that make perfect polymer clay texture sheets.  I got some brass pipe and metal parts that I will recycle into jewelry.   If I wanted one of the vintage stoves that seem to be all the rage these days,  I could pick one up at the Construction Junction and restore it to working order.




The place is HUGE, the staff is friendly and there is plenty of parking.  Check it out if you find yourself in Pittsburgh.



Into The Forest In Pittsburgh

Spinning Plate Gallery Pittsburgh

We drove across the state last week to attend the opening of Into The Forest.  There was so much to look at!  And the opening was packed.  I’m glad I was able to go back to the gallery the next day and get another look.  I was constantly seeing things I hadn’t noticed the night before.  What a treat!  But I’m afraid I have run out of words about now so here are some pictures from Into The Forest.

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You can  buy the exhibition catalog which contains a picture of every contribution along with the name  and locale of the artists.  For more information, press  here.   But the pictures and the catalog are not a substitute for walking into the forest yourself.  The exhibit runs until December 3 and is worth a trip to Pittsburgh.