Polymer Clay Videos on YouTube


I have gotten back into polymer clay after a couple of years on hiatus. I’m always looking for new polymer clay ideas and YouTube is loaded with polymer clay tutorials. So every night, after my husband has gone to bed, I pour myself a glass of wine and Boris and I plop in front of the TV and troll YouTube for new videos.

The problem with YouTube is the algorithms it uses can actually limit the videos is recommends to you because of the way the algorithms work. I am not going to pretend that I know how to beat the algorithms. What I have found, however, is that if you subscribe to any channel with videos that interest you, you will get a wider variety of new recommended videos in your feed. Subscribe to the channels for those videos and you will get an ven wider array of recommendations. And on and on.

I have finally started to get new (to me) polymer videos from Europe and Asia which, while not always in English are easy to follow, and sometimes subtitled. Lots of interesting stuff. Here’s some stuff I’ve found.

Donna Kato has a new channel and is adding new videos to it steadily. Much of the material is basic but she presents it in the inimitable Kato way and you always learn something new. The video below is part of a series on how to make hollow carved beads.

Sona Grigoryan from Spain

Ludmila Bakulina, Ukraine by way of Thailand

From Sandartes, hollow translucent beads. I always wanted to know how to color translucent clay without making it opaque. Now I know.

Watch a few videos and get your creative juices flowing.

Some New Polymer Clay Products to Try

People are always asking me what’s the best polymer clay to try, where can I get ideas for polymer clay projects, where can I buy polymer clay, and what are the best polymer clay tutorials?

The best polymer clay for you depends on what you’re using it for. Everyone knows that Sculpey III is soft and not very durable when cured. But it comes in a rainbow of colors. It’s best suited for children’s projects.

Cernit is becoming more popular in the United States and for a good reason. The array of colors are stunning, and it is sturdy and beautiful when cured properly.

Kato Polyclay is known for its strength and ability to hold its shape making it ideal for caning. I’ve used Kato clay in the past with great success. It can be a little challenging to condition, but the results are worth it.

I generally use Premo Sculpey which is durable, flexible, and very strong when properly cured. I blend my own colors, although they do have a large number of colors for people who don’t care to mix their own.

You end up with scrap when you work with polymer. There’s really no such thing as “waste clay” because everything can be used. But sometimes I forget to separate my colors (here’s a video showing how that’s done) and I end up with a lot of mud.

So I was thrilled when Donna Kato announced a new product, Kato Blackout Clay, at Clayathon. (Here’s the video.) Blackout clay turns any color of polymer clay to black. I’m always using black. I was excited!

But was there a problem? Like I said, I use mostly Premo which cures at 275 degrees Fahrenheit. Kato clay cures at 300 degrees Fahrenheit. How would the blended clay hold up if I mixed them together? My friend Patty came over the other week and mixed up a bunch of clay and we tested. Here are the results.

We mixed Kato Blackout clay with Premo. The Kato was 12.5% by size. (I trust Patty on this. She can recite Avogadro’s Law from memory. And it’s been a long time since high school.) She cut out 1 1/2 ” circles of thicknesses ranging from #1 on my Atlas pasta machine (about 1/8″) to #9 (thinnest setting). We baked them on a tile at 275 F for an hour, let them cool, and then I tried to destroy them. I could not.

As you can see, I was able to bend each circle almost in half. I don’t have a picture of the thinnest disc, but believe me, it didn’t break. I don’t recommend you do this with all of your clay, but I wanted to see how well the Premo and Kato Blackout clay worked together. The answer is, “just fine.”

I also tried a little of the Kato Liquid Gold clay. I smeared some on some previously-cured Premo clay and liked the effect.

You can buy Kato Blackout Clay and Kato Liquid Gold here.