Ugly Cane School Part Two

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Did someone say ugly canes?  How is working with this waste clay supposed to get me out of my creative slump?  I won’t say these are the ugliest canes in the world (at least they have some contrast.  Well,  of them anyway), but they do not thrill me.

I decided to slice and bake this time with the idea that I could turn out components that would look good in earrings.    I must say that I was partly inspired by these cutters I bought at Clayathon from Linda Prais of Linda’s Art Spot .
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But cool cutters will not turn ugly canes into pretty ones:

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Here’s an attempt to turn some of those less than perfect canes into earring components.  Not too successful, but I am learning.  “It’s like dating,” I tell myself. “You learn what you like by learning what you don’t like.”   Well, I am sure learning what I don’t like.

 

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Aaugh!  Oodles and oodles of ugly components.  Most of them will go into the trash can.  But I am learning and I am even starting to be inspired.  More next week.

 

Ugly Cane School and Some Inspiration

I must confess that I have been singularly uninspired these past few weeks.  This hardly ever happens to me.  I’m back in the pottery studio and even threw a few pots last week which is great considering that I had CMC joint reconstruction surgery in October.

I have amassed a collection of canes over the years that I haven’t used and that have become crumbly with age.  A few years ago, I played with a bunch of them to see what I could come up with.   Today,  I dug up a few of the components I made and they’re not bad.  I think I’ll take a few to Clayathon and see if I can combine them with wire work to make some necklaces.    In the meantime,  I am going to dig through my old canes to see if I can do anything with them.  More on that next week.

Anyway, here are some results from my first ugly cane experiment.  I made veneers by passing sliced canes through the pasta machine and laminating them on sheets of clay.  I kept rolling and laminating until I came up with something interesting.  I set some of the pieces in metal, mostly heavy-gauge copper wire which I squared in my rolling mill.   I limited my color palate, something I did not do with the ugly cane experiments you will see next week. Let’s see where these ugly canes take me.

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Lentil-shaped component
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Unfinished piece.  I was still trying things out.

I made some pendants using jump rings to attach the lentil-shaped front component to a back component. While most lentil beads are attached at the edges, the parts of these swing freely.

 

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I also tried different ways of setting the polymer bezels in the metal.  This one is suspended by a jump ring drilled into the big ring which is soldered onto the long bail

I attached the polymer piece to this pendant by drilling holes in the polymer and threading 30 gauge wire to wrap around the metal frame.

 

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I attached the polymer here with tabs I soldered onto the frame and bent around the polymer.  Read this post for more information on tab setting.

 

Earrings
Simple earrings with grommets and silver wire.   They are very light.

More examples of  uses for ugly canes next week.